The role of simulation in education and training in neonatal care

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Authors

van den Hoogen A, Johnston L, Roehr CC, Gözen D, Mannix T, Kühn T, Panas M, Petty J, Schlembach D, Simeone N, Stoniene D, Tency I

Click on the image to read the standard in brief.

Target group

Infants, parents, and families


User group

Parents and families, healthcare professionals, neonatal units, hospitals, health services, and education providers


Statement of standard

All healthcare professionals develop and maintain competencies to provide safe and effective care through regular simulation-based learning.


Rationale

Simulation replaces or amplifies real experiences with guided experiences, often immersive in nature, that evoke or replicate substantial aspects of the real world in a fully interactive fashion. (1) Simulation is a superior method to educate healthcare providers in a broad range of clinical skills. Traditional strategies, such as the “see one, do one, teach one” approach result in uneven skill acquisition and unnecessary harm to patients. (2) The inclusion of simulation in training is valuable with respect to how personnel are educated, trained, and sustained in providing safe clinical care. (1,3–5)


Benefits


Components of the standard

Component

Grading of evidence

Indicator of meeting the standard

For parents and family

  1. Parents and families are involved in development and delivery of simulation scenarios by healthcare professionals.

B (Moderate quality)

Training documentation

For healthcare professionals

  1. Simulation training is attended by all healthcare professionals. (3)

A (Moderate quality)
B (High quality)

Training documentation

For neonatal unit

  1. Simulation is incorporated in the training programmes. (5)

A (Moderate quality)
B (High quality)

Training documentation

For hospital

  1. Simulation training is ensured.

B (High quality)

Training documentation

  1. Facilities and equipment for simulation are provided. (5)

A (Moderate quality)
B (Moderate quality)

Audit report1

For health service

  1. Nationwide education programmes incorporating simulation techniques are established and regularly updated.

B (High quality)

Training documentation

For education provider

  1. Undergraduate and graduate programmes incorporate simulation in curricula.

B (High quality)

Training documentation

  1. Parents are given the opportunity to be engaged in the delivery of simulation scenarios.

B (Low quality)

Training documentation

1The indicator “audit report” can also be defined as a benchmarking report.


Where to go

Further development

Grading of evidence

For parents and family

  • Contribute to the development of simulation scenarios.

B (Low quality)

For healthcare professionals

N/A

For neonatal unit

N/A

For hospital

  • Integrate simulation as a routine part of the “every day” work environment. (5)

A (Moderate quality)

For health service

N/A

For education provider

N/A


Getting started

Initial steps

For parents and family

  • Invite parents to observe simulation scenarios.

For healthcare professionals

  • Participate in simulation training.

For neonatal unit

  • Develop simulation scenarios.

For hospital

  • Support healthcare professionals to participate in simulation training.
  • Provide access to simulation laboratories and equipment.

For education provider

  • Provide access to simulation laboratories and equipment.
  • Provide parents with the opportunity to develop simulation scenarios within curricula.

  1. Gaba DM. The future vision of simulation in health care. Qual Saf Health Care. 2004 Oct;13 Suppl 1:i2-10.
  2. Barsuk JH, Cohen ER, Wayne DB, Siddall VJ, McGaghie WC. Developing a Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Curriculum: Lessons From 11 Years of Advanced Cardiac Life Support. Simul Healthc J Soc Simul Healthc. 2016 Feb;11(1):52–9.
  3. Stephenson E, Salih Z, Cullen DL. Advanced Practice Nursing Simulation for Neonatal Skill Competency: A Pilot Study for Successful Continuing Education. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2015 Jul;46(7):322–5.
  4. Dempsey E, Pammi M, Ryan AC, Barrington KJ. Standardised formal resuscitation training programmes for reducing mortality and morbidity in newborn infants. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Sep 4;(9):CD009106.
  5. Jansson M, Kääriäinen M, Kyngäs H. Effectiveness of Simulation-Based Education in Critical Care Nurses’ Continuing Education: A Systematic Review. Clin Simul Nurs. 2013 Sep 1;9(9):e355–60.

November 2018 / 1st edition / next revision: 2021


Recommended citation

EFCNI, van den Hoogen A, Johnston L et al., European Standards of Care for Newborn Health: The role of simulation in education and training in neonatal care. 2018.