Search

Neonatal resuscitation training

Authors

van den Hoogen A, Johnston L, Roehr CC, Panas M, Gözen D, Mannix T, Kühn T, Petty J, Schlembach D, Simeone N, Stoniene D, Tency I

© simcharacters.com

User group

Healthcare professionals, neonatal units, hospitals, and health services

Statement of standard

Every healthcare professional is given access to and undertakes regular neonatal resuscitation training.

Rationale

Research suggests that in institutions in Europe where Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) training has taken place, the incidence of significant morbidities in the immediate newborn period may be reduced, even in countries where a severe shortage of equipment and supplies exists. (1)

Healthcare professionals formally trained in resuscitation require additional input to maintain their competence in neonatal resuscitation. (1–3) To ensure infants in need of resuscitation have access to appropriate and qualified care, physicians, nurses and midwives should be routinely certified in neonatal basic life support.

Benefits

Short-term benefits

  • Reduced mortality and morbidity (1)

Long-term benefits

  • Improved long-term outcomes with timely and effective resuscitation (2)

 

Components of the standard

Component Grading of evidence Indicator of meeting the standard
For parents and family    
1. Parents and families are informed by healthcare professionals about neonatal resuscitation training and have an opportunity for resuscitation training before discharge. B (High quality) Patient information sheet, training documentation
       
2. Parents are supported to stay with their infant during resuscitation if they wish. (4,5) A (Moderate quality)
B (Low quality)
Clinical record, parent feedback
       
For healthcare professionals    
3. Training in resuscitation using the European guidelines is attended by all responsible physicians, nurses and midwifes. (1) A (High quality)
B (High quality)
Training documentation
       
For neonatal unit    
4. Recertification evidence is regularly audited. (3) A (High quality) Audit report, training documentation
       
For hospital    
5. Training in resuscitation is ensured. B (High quality) Training documentation
       
For health service    
  N/A    
       

Where to go

Further development Grading of evidence
For parents and family  
N/A  
For healthcare professionals  
N/A  
For neonatal unit  
N/A  
For hospital  
N/A  
For health service  
N/A  
   

Getting started

Initial steps
For parents and family
  • Parents and families are informed by healthcare professionals about neonatal resuscitation and training options.
  • Parents and families have an opportunity for resuscitation training at time of discharge. (6)
For healthcare professionals
  • Attend training in resuscitation.
  • Access E-learning modules regarding newborn life support (NLS and advanced NLS).
For neonatal unit
  • Provide in-house training using European guidelines. (1)
  • Provide easy access to E-learning modules regarding newborn life support (NLS and advanced NLS).
For hospital
  • Support healthcare professionals to participate in training in resuscitation.
  • Provide in-house training using European guidelines. (1)
For health service
N/A
 

Sources

  1. Wyllie J, Bruinenberg J, Roehr CC, Rüdiger M, Trevisanuto D, Urlesberger B. European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015 Section 7. Resuscitation and support of transition of babies at birth. Resuscitation. 2015;95:249–63.
  2. Duran R, Görker I, Küçükuğurluoğlu Y, Çiftdemir NA, Vatansever Özbek U, Acunaş B. Effect of neonatal resuscitation courses on long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes of newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia. Pediatr Int Off J Jpn Pediatr Soc. 2012 Feb;54(1):56–9.
  3. Cusack J, Fawke J. Neonatal resuscitation: are your trainees performing as you think they are? A retrospective review of a structured resuscitation assessment for neonatal medical trainees over an 8-year period. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2012 Jul;97(4):F246-248.
  4. McAlvin SS, Carew-Lyons A. Family presence during resuscitation and invasive procedures in pediatric critical care: a systematic review. Am J Crit Care Off Publ Am Assoc Crit-Care Nurses. 2014 Nov;23(6):477–484; quiz 485.
  5. Powers KA. Educational Interventions to Improve Support for Family Presence During Resuscitation: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Dimens Crit Care Nurs DCCN. 2017 Apr;36(2):125–38.
  6. Care Quality Commission. Identifying and managing clinical risks in newborn babies and providing care for infants in the community who need respiratory support [Internet]. [cited 2018 May 15]. Available from: http://www.cqc.org.uk/sites/default/files/20160707_babyclinicalrisks_web.pdf

November 2018 / 1st edition / next revision: 2023

Recommended citation

EFCNI, van den Hoogen A, Johnston L et al., European Standards of Care for Newborn Health: Neonatal resuscitation training. 2018.

For the purpose of evaluation, we would be grateful if you could send us details on your profession and country. This information is optional, anonymous and the data processed will exclusively be used for the aforementioned purpose, in line with Article 6, Para. 1 lit. a GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation).

Thank you for your support!